Go Wild School Grants | WWF-Canada
©: École Primaire Des Jolis-Prés

Go Wild School Grants

Thank you for your interest in helping nature thrive at your school! The fall 2016 application period has now closed.

From coast to coast to coast, Canada is bursting with natural riches, diverse species and varied ecosystems that sustain us and provide benefits essential for a healthy life.

WWF-Canada asked schools to Go Wild for Canada’s 150th, making their school’s birthday gift to Canada a healthy environment by teaching students about environmental issues and connecting the school community to nature. We heard from over 100 schools that want to help nature thrive alongside schools! Stay tuned for the announcement of recipients.

Find out what other schools have done: meet the 2015 Go Wild School Grant winners

École St Joseph's Preschool, Yellowknife, NT
Creating kits for safe student exploration of wild habitats in Northwest Territories

Dewdney Elementary School, Dewdney, BC
Exploring wind as an alternative energy source for a rural BC school community

HD Stafford Middle School, Langley, BC
Without many opportunities to connect to nature, this urban school will travel to local streams to connect to nature and help it thrive through shoreline cleanups

Henry Anderson Elementary, Richmond, BC
In one of the wettest cities in British Columbia, students will celebrate Forest Fridays, taking to the outdoors rain or shine to learn about forest ecosystems

St Anthony's School, Drumheller, AB
Composting to support indoor and outdoor school gardens, allowing monarchs to thrive

Westmount School, Okotoks, AB
A Living Wall: conversion of modular walls to create a self-sustaining green space inside the school

A.H. Dakin School, Edson, AB
Bean Pole Teepee project to support imaginative play in a natural space, welcoming First Nation Elders

Banded Peak School, Bragg Creek, AB
Bat Observation Station

High Prairie Elementary School, High Prairie, AB
Restoring a concrete courtyard to a natural ecosystem

Victoria School, Kamsack, SK
Upgrading school gardens and greenspaces for physical and visual impairments, increasing the accessibility of nature for all students

Macdonald School, Stockholm, SK
Creating educational signage for a nature trail, incorporating QR codes and trail cameras for deepened study and exploration

Governor Semple School, Winnipeg, MB
Naturalizing their school’s front yard to provide green space to students and the local neighborhood community

Oak Lake Community School, Oak Lake, MB
Go Wild for Birds! Educating students about at-risk birds and their habitats

Rivers Collegiate, Rivers, MB
Helping the community to remove Black Knot fungus from infected chokecherry trees

Ethel Gardiner Public School, Georgetown, ON
Bat boxes will be created by each class and hung around the city with the help of city employees to raise awareness for at-risk bats

Meadowvale Village Public School, Mississauga, ON
Creating an electronic portfolio for the community to highlight the impacts of a new butterfly garden

Dorset Drive Public School, Brampton, ON
A school-wide outdoor classroom inviting each class to adopt its own school garden

St Anthony Catholic Elementary School, Thornhill, ON
Following the success of their outdoor garden to increase monarchs in their schoolyard, additional spaces will be created to support more critters

Colchester North Public School, Essex, ON
An outdoor classroom to study species of the school pond

École élémentaire catholique Saint-Noël-Chabanel, Cambridge, ON
Creating a garden habitat home for the students’ classroom-raised butterflies

Houghton Public School, Langton, ON
An outdoor classroom to protect existing trees on the playground

Beau Valley Public School, Oshawa, ON
Raising awareness for reduction of emissions through some friendly competition

Charles G Fraser P.S., Toronto, ON
Engaging Toronto students about sustainable urban spaces by creating and presenting their own models of a green Toronto to the chief city planner

Conestoga Public School, Brampton, ON
Naturalizing the schoolyard for birds

Mapleview Heights Elementary School, Barrie, ON
Families of students will each take a section of the new gardens under their wing, adopting it for the school

Allan A Martin Sr Public School, Mississauga, ON
Earth Day, every day! Encouraging complete removal of plastic water bottles, caring for shorelines and engaging the entire school with a new garden
 
Kincardine Township Tiverton Public School, Kincardine, ON
Caring for and observing Chinook salmon eggs before releasing hatchlings

Nottawa Elementary School, Collingwood, ON
Creating new roosting sites and homes for at-risk bats at school and at home

Queen Elizabeth Public School, Leamington, ON
An information station at a local trail educating visitors about native trees with an interactive map for students and the community

Macphail Memorial Elementary School, Flesherton, ON
Geocaching scavenger hunt for students, their families and the online geocaching community

Castle Oaks Public School, Brampton, ON
Restoring the Humber River watershed with plantings of indigenous species

Ridgewood Public School, Mississauga, ON
A learning garden fertilized by a new compost system, welcoming birds and pollinators for classroom study

Sandwich West Public School, LaSalle, ON
Supporting monarchs along their migratory route near Point Pelee National Park

R.L. Graham P.S., Keswick, ON
All-season, after-school student hikes of York Regional Forest to study seasonal changes of trees and the forest

École Des Jolis-Prés, Laterrière, QC
Schoolyard and neighborhood wetland adoption

École de l'Assomption, Fabre, QC
Improving water quality by planting shrubs to stabilize riverbanks. Students will study the water quality impacts before and after stabilization project

Devon Middle School, Fredericton, NB
Celebrating water conservation and traditional knowledge with First Nation Elders

Cambridge-Narrows Community School, Fredericton, NB
Enhance local trail for the school and wider community with learning boxes, signage and kits for exploration

Atlantic View Elementary School, Lawrencetown, NS
Reconstituting an overgrown walking path to supplement existing outdoor classroom

Beachy Cove Elementary, Portugal Cove-St Phillips. NL
Cleaning up green spaces while geocaching math questions around Beachy Cove
 
About WWF
WWF-Canada is creating solutions to the most serious conservation challenges facing our planet, helping people and nature thrive.
 
For further information:
Jarmila Becka Lee, specialist, nature-connected communities, gowild@wwfcanada.org

 

©: naturepl.com / Ingo Arndt / WWF
©: WWF-Canada

FAQ: Frequently asked questions

Who can apply for a Go Wild School Grant?

Go Wild School Grants is a nationwide granting program targeting students, teachers, classrooms and schools, Grades K to 12. Ideas can take place either in or outside of school.

Teachers, students and parents/guardians of students are welcome to share their ideas.

Please note: Applications must be completed by a teacher. Are you a student? Talk to your teacher about your idea on how to Go Wild and apply together.

What type of projects are we looking for?

We are looking for ideas that:

Protect or restore: Activities directly related to restoring, rehabilitating, or recovering natural ecosystems or addressing the impacts of climate change.

Practice or monitor: Activities directly related to introducing new practices that reflect the value of nature in the school community or develop new practices related to the impact of climate change.

Celebrate or educate: Activities that enhance the importance of healthy natural ecosystems while also increasing student understanding of environmental issues and inspiring environmental leadership and action!

What if my school is in an urban area?

Nature isn’t just found in far-off places or pristine wilderness, it’s all around us. We invite you to seek out nature in the nooks and crannies of the city and to define for yourself what ‘connecting to nature’ means.

How do I apply?

The application period for Fall 2016 has now closed. Stay tuned for future opportunities for how your school can Go Wild with WWF-Canada

I applied for a Fall 2016 Go Wild School Grant. When will I hear back?

Projects selected for funding will be announced by December 23, 2016. Please note that only projects selected for funding will be contacted.

What can I pay for with my grant? 

Hard costs and fees associated with the proposed activities are appropriate expenses. These could include (but are not limited to): materials, communications or promotional costs, costs associated with documenting the project, permits, and facility or vehicle rental fees, if necessary.

Can I pay myself with my grant?

Staff salaries, honoraria, or any other fees not directly related to the proposed activity are not eligible expenses

Can I apply more than once? 

You can apply as many times as you want, but we will only grant to one of your project ideas.

How are you judging the ideas?

The ideas will be evaluated by a panel of judges based on the following criteria:

  • Overall quality and relevance of project: How and to what extent will the work contribute to improving the health of nature in the school community? How will you measure results? How creative is it? Does it involve one of the following key themes related to nature: protect, restore, monitor, celebrate, educate?
  • Community engagement: How many students will participate in the project? How effective is the project in connecting students to nature in their community? Is there opportunity to engage the broader school community, such as other students, parents/caregivers?
  • Potential to replicate: Can this project be sustained beyond the first year? Can this project be expanded to a bigger scale? Could it include other stakeholders and/or school communities?
  • Communications: Does this project tell a good story? Is it fun?
  • Implementation plan: Is the implementation plan reasonable?  Can the goals be met according to the budget and timeline?
  • Budget: Is the budget appropriate for the proposed activities? Does the project have any in-kind support?

More questions?

For questions regarding Go Wild School Grants, please email
gowild@wwfcanada.org or call us at 1-800-26-PANDA (72632).

©: Roger Hallett / WWF-Canada

Regulations and guidelines for recipients: Fall 2016

Go Wild is a WWF-Canada-led initiative soliciting ideas from school communities between October 3 and November 18, 2016. The application period is now closed.

Eligibility
Ideas that qualify for granting must:

  • Take place within the school community
  • Be completed by June 2, 2017
  • Not be associated with a for-profit entity

Your application should include a description of how you will implement your idea. Implementation plans for those ideas selected for funding will be reviewed and approved by WWF-Canada staff before signing the grant agreement.

By accepting funding from WWF-Canada, you are agreeing to:

  • Implement your idea and plan
  • Share stories, information, photographs and possibly videos (when suitable) from your project. All funded projects will be profiled and promoted by WWF-Canada on various communications channels, where relevant.

Eligible activity categories
Go Wild will contribute up to $500 to support practical, hands-on projects that aim to expand connections between students and nature in their school communities in one or more of the following ways:

  • Protect or restore: Activities directly related to restoring, rehabilitating, or recovering natural ecosystems or addressing the impacts of climate change
  • Practice or monitor: Activities directly related to introducing new practices that reflect the value of nature in the school community or develop new practices related to the impact of climate change
  • Celebrate or educate: Activities that enhance the importance of healthy natural ecosystems as fundamental to a healthy school community, and healthy communities more generally.

Eligible applicants

  • Schools, classrooms, or student groups
  • Grades K - 12

Eligible costs
Hard costs and fees associated with the proposed activities are appropriate expenses. These could include (but are not limited to): equipment and field costs such as rental of equipment to complete the project; materials, communications or promotional costs; costs associated with documenting the project; permits; and facility or vehicle rental fees, if necessary.

Non-eligible costs
Staff salaries, honoraria, or any other fees not directly related to the proposed activity are not eligible expenses.

Timing and notification information
Projects selected for funding will be announced by December 23, 2016. Only projects selected for funding will be contacted.
 
Successful applicants will have until June 2, 2017 to complete projects and reporting requirements.

Assessment criteria
All projects will be assessed using the following criteria. Following each criterion is a list of considerations that the Go Wild School Grants selection panel will consider when evaluating each proposal.

  • Overall quality and relevance of project: How and to what extent will the work contribute to improving the health of nature in the school community? How will you measure results? How creative is it? Does it involve one of the following key themes related to nature: protect, restore, monitor, celebrate, educate?
  • Community engagement: How many students will participate in the project? How effective is the project in connecting students to nature in their community? Is there opportunity to engage the broader school community, such as other students, parents/caregivers?
  • Potential to replicate: Can this project be sustained beyond the first year? Can this project be expanded to a bigger scale? Could it include other stakeholders and/or school communities?
  • Communications: Does this project tell a good story? Is it fun?
  • Implementation plan: Is the implementation plan reasonable?  Can the goals be met according to the budget and timeline?
  • Budget: Is the budget appropriate for the proposed activities? Does the project have any in-kind support?

Permits
Successful applicants are responsible for identifying and obtaining any permits, licences or other approvals required in order to begin and/or complete the project.

Terms of reference
This call for proposals is not intended to be a formal legally-binding procurement process.

WWF-Canada reserves the right to seek clarification and supplementary information from any applicant.

WWF-Canada may elect not to consider a proposal containing misrepresentations or any inaccurate, misleading or incomplete information.

Once a project proposal has been submitted, it cannot be modified or changed.